"Pink Slime" Prevails in Supermarket Meat
PS.jpg
Consumers were recently shocked to learn of the widespread use of ammonium-treated lean beef trimmings. Popularly known as "pink slime," this pink-colored meat filler is created by treating beef scraps and cow connective tissue with ammonium hydroxide to kill off E. coli, salmonella, and other dangerous pathogens that may be present.

According to a recent ABC News report by Jim Avila, 70 percent of the ground beef at US supermarkets now contains pink slime. Consumers have apparently been kept in the dark about this unpleasant ingredient because U.S. Department of Agriculture officials ― including an undersecretary of agriculture with ties to the beef industry ― have let it remain unlisted on meat labels.

While many are rightfully concerned about the presence of pink slime in grocery store meat and in school lunches, this is just the most recent item added to the beef industry's growing list of unappetizing offenses. Cows raised for beef are routinely inflicted with third-degree burns (hot-iron branding) and have their horns burned out of their skulls, all without any painkillers. The crowded and unsanitary conditions of feedlots also make perfect breeding grounds for disease ― including antibiotic-resistant superbugs.

Thankfully, we can choose to distance ourselves from the sickness and cruelty that run rampant on factory farms. Visit ChooseVeg.com for delicious, cruelty-free recipes and tips on transitioning to a healthy and humane vegan diet.

MORE FROM THE MFA BLOG